All posts by reallyawfulmovies

About reallyawfulmovies

The Really Awful Movies Podcast features smart chat about genre film, predominantly horror movies. Really Awful Movies aren’t REALLY awful (though they can be). The title was inspired by the phrase “Why do you have to watch those awful movies?” This Podcast is a tribute to our favorite genre, horror, and also kung fu, exploitation, action, women-in-prison, musicals and others

Really Awful Movies: Ep 256 – Cellar Dweller



Jeffrey Combs portrays Colin Childress, a cartoonist we’re introduced to in the film’s prologue. He meets an untimely end drawing a beastly creature, and we flash forward 30 years to a present-day (1988) artist retreat/colony.

This week on the Really Awful Movies Podcast: a monster movie! This one is a charming shoestring budget creature feature, Cellar Dweller.

Whitney is an arts graduate and cartoonist, and attends the school, trying to keep Childress’ spirit alive and well through her drawings.

There are also fellow students, each pursuing a different facet of the arts: sculpture, method acting, new media, abstract painting, etc.

The school’s headmistress puts out a stern warning to the pupils: do not go in the basement! And of course, the different principals don’t heed any of this. I mean, this is the horror genre, why would we expect anything different?

Check out this episode of the Really Awful Movies Podcast, and be sure to subscribe and leave a review on iTunes.


Really Awful Movies: Ep 255 – Humanoids from the Deep



Humanoids from the Deep is one of our favorite creature features. Exploitative, Roger Corman-produced uber-trash, this one follows the typical Jaws template of a besieged fishing village whose inhabitants are trying to come to terms with something that’s pure evil.

Featuring some genre favorites like Doug McClure and Vic Morrow, you won’t help but fall for this movie. After all, “they hunt human women…not for killing…for mating.”

Corman’s company, New World Pictures was the distributor. And Humanoids from the Deep was directed by Barbara Peeters (who subsequently tried to distance herself from the exploitative finished product). There’s a peppy musical score composed by James Horner in his debut.